Posts Tagged ‘Timber frame construction’


Please to report we completed on our purchase of our little renovation project on the 19th April!

I rushed home from work full of anticipation and tinged with just a little trepidation of what was ahead of us. As we’d seen the property before purchase there were no real surprises, other than we hadn’t seen the house without any of the previous owners things inside. Now we could view it in all its 16th century charm!


As I stepped into the cottage it looked a bit grim if I’m honest. 70’s built in wardrobes made from white Formica board everywhere, floors creaking and sloping in pretty much every direction. Signs of damp in the upstairs rooms … the only way I can describe this little house is it felt unloved.

A quick look in the loft reveals no party wall between our house and next door which I’m told is illegal and will need to be resolved asap.
The roof appears to sit on two enormous timber joists which were cut from old trees at the time the house was built … which probably dates the timbers to over 600 years old.

In the bathroom is a bluish green suite which I’m not sure I’ve seen before … and the floor underneath the bath is at least 3 inches lower than the rest of the floor. I suspect it has little in the way of support hence the floor has sagged over the years.

The hot water tank is brand new but it will be going as we’re replacing the entire system with a new combination boiler. Reason being we can free up the space for storage which is at a premium in such a tiny house.

 

The kitchen is … well … pretty basic. The units are left over from the 60’s and the floor is made up of hideous blue carpet tiles. Pulling one back reveals an old brown and white chequered lino tiled floor. I’d rather hoped we might some original flag stones, but appears to be solid concrete. Ah well … we can dream. The walls have a light blue tile which has seen better days .. and right slap bang in the middle is a 70’s open plan staircase.

Moving on to the living room it has a beautiful old fireplace which has been blocked off and a gas fire stood in front. Can’t wait to rip that out and see what hides behind.


Wow … clearly there is much to be done if this little cottage is to survive another 400 years.  But the good news is we have a plan and work has already started. We’re going to strip the house back to its bare bones and put it back together again hopefully creating a beautiful little period home.

Good news is we’ve already made a start and although progress is slow we’ve recorded everything in pictures and we’ve also recorded some video for a series we plan to put out on YouTube this summer.

In the next post we’ll share what we found as we started to reveal the framework of the property and more specifically a very nasty surprise in the bathroom. 😉

Oh and if you’d like to know more about any aspect of our little restoration send an email to ruralgardeners@gmail.com and we’ll be happy to share.

Back soon.

 

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Just a quick update on our shed/office conversion project.

The outside has been clad in new feather board. The old stuff had warped and wasn’t really up the task which was largely down to poor fixing by yours truly.

Window linings are in and the inside has been plastered. All it needs now is the glass to go in, door hanging and the floor down and finally decorating throughout.

I’ll post again when the jobs done. 🙂

Great view out to the climbing rose from the windows.

Great view out to the climbing rose from the windows.

Shed Office Conversion

Shed Office Conversion

Glad I got the professionals in for the plastering. Know your limits. 🙂

 

Shed Office Conversion

It’s going to need a small step.

 

Thank goodness we have a long weekend coming!  🙂

Thanks all.

John And Tania The Rural Gardeners

 

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How to Convert a Shed to a Home Office

Ever longed to work from home and thought you might convert your trusty shed into an office?

If the answer is yes then you’re in very good company as at the last count over 3 million of us had the same idea and are now enjoying the benefits of working from home.

Did you know Roger Waters created the early demo tracks for the album  Dark Side of the Moon in his garden shed outside his Islington home! … and not a lot of people know that. 🙂

Of course working from home is not for everyone but if you are able to maybe spend a day or two working from the comfort and familiarity of the home the benefits to your health are significant.

Well, this year we’ve decided its time to get off the fence and we’re going for it!  I can’t tell you just how excited I am about what we have planned for the new office … so much so I just had to share it with you.

What are the options for a home office?
  • Invest in a ready made structure. (Expensive)
  • Spare room in the house. (Never quite the same as having your own kingdom)
  • Renovate an existing building. (Cheaper option … And you get to do some diy!)
We’ve opted for option 3 as we already have a sizeable timber structure which we built back in 2008 as a general store for our self build. Its large enough and pretty solid. With a little tweaking to the design it will make a great little office.

Rather than simply writing about the whys and wherefores of working from home we thought this project offered a great opportunity to look back at how the construction has stood up to the test of time and if there is anything we would have done differently so anyone building their own shed or outbuilding in the future could benefit from the insight.

Its a solid enough building made from quality pressure treated timber and has stood up well to everything we’ve chucked at it over the last few years.

If you’ve read our original series of posts on the build you’ll be familiar with the construction. Timber frame made almost entirely from pressure treated softwood. We based it on a workshop Tommy Walsh built on TV a few years ago.

The interior walls are clad with OSB board which is ok but I prefer a clean uninterrupted surface so have decided to line with plasterboard and get a plasterer to plaster the walls. Only you know how much insulation you’ve stuffed in the walls or how well the building was constructed … but the finish on the walls will be seen by everyone so it needs to be right hence employing a plasterer.

Plasterboard on OSB

The workshop was clad in OSB … simply screw 12mm plasterboard to the walls to make a perfect surface to plaster.

If there is one thing we’ve learned after many years of DIY is know your limits.

Don’t be afraid to get the professionals in when you know its beyond you.

We’re going to need power and heat if its to function as a warm cosy space.

We already have an approved electricity supply which used to service the workshop. I’ve had it safety checked by Tom (my son the electrician at ENL Electrical Services Ltd) and we have plenty of power for a computer, printer, kettle and few other home comforts.

I’d like to power it with Solar but budget is tight so for now I’m going to have to stick with the grid.

Four inches of insulation in the walls and ceilings should keep it nice and snug!

Insulate your shed

For the cold days heating will come from a modest electric wall heater.

We’ve moved the entrance to south facing to capture the morning sun.

Home Office

The side facing the lawn will now have two glass panels which has meant a bit of a restructuring but as the stud walls were fixed using screws so simple enough to sort.

How to Convert a Shed to a Home Office

If you’re one of the 50,000 or so readers that read our series on How to build your own workshop we’ve noticed a couple of things we’d change about the original build.

Keeping The Roof Water Tight
When we took a closer look at the roof we noticed it had been leaking which was as a result of the roofing felt starting to perish. On closer examination I had to replace a couple of sheets of plywood where the damp had penetrated the layers of ply. Definitely worth checking once a year.

But hey it didn’t take a lot of effort to fix. Simply removed the screws swapped the ply for new replaced with new felt.

One of our readers sent in a great tip for anyone thinking of felting a roof.

Paint the roof timbers with bitumen before laying the roofing felt. That way if the roof leaks it won’t damage the wood. Excellent idea!

Flooring
The floor is a basic slab of concrete which would be fine for the new office but I’m worried about the floor being cold so I’ve decided to lay some standard chip board floor on a layer of thin super efficient insulation. It means I’ll lose 15-20 millimetres of off the floor to ceiling but still leaves minimum 2.2 ceiling height which is recommended.

Doors and windows
John made the doors on the original workshop which were fine for a workshop but will not work for the new shoffice. So we’ve invested in a ready made frame and a hemlock door which will be fitted with all the usual security considerations. As you can see the door has been moved which to be honest has greatly improved the overall aspect of the building. The original window will stay where it is and a couple of extra laminated glass panels have been added to take advantage of the view across the garden and to the fields beyond.

Cladding the exterior
We’re replacing the feather board as it’s not as good as it was and has warped in places. Im pretty sure this is down to the the fixing. I read somewhere at the time you should nail feather board an inch from the thin end of the board. Well that’s crap idea in my opinion. Always nail through the thickest part of the board and ensure at least an inch of overlap over the next board. If you can afford it use cedar boards as they will weather to a beautiful silver colour and they will last a lot longer.

Feather edge cladding

The old feather edge has started to warp … just make sure you fix it through the thickest part of the board.

So to summarise here are the key learnings from the original build:

1. Pay a little extra and use treated (tantalised) timber and the structure will last a lot longer.

2. Ensure feather board is fixed firmly and treat once a year with a good quality wood preservative.

3. Inspect the roofing felt at least once a year.

4. Concrete floors are fine but add a layer of chipboard or something similar to improve insulation.

5. Don’t scrimp on insulation as it really does make a difference on those cold winter days.

We’re planning on finishing the bulk of the construction work this weekend so will post an update next week … so if you’d like a gentle reminder when the next instalment is posted simply register for our newsletter here and we’ll drop you a note.

Thanks!

Best wishes

rural-gardeners

 

 

… still living the dream.

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 The garden is providing plenty and the nursery continues to generate a lot of interest, but it was a particularly special month for us for two reasons.

Tania had a very important birthday, one of those milestone events that happen about every 50 years 😉 and we also had our 29th wedding anniversary which we celebrated with the most wonderful garden party with  friends and family.

We’ve actually been together for over 30 years which is almost a lifetime I guess, but it’s been a very special time and we’re both great advocates of the institute of marriage.

The garden and nursery were a hit and we had some really nice comments so thank you to everyone that came and made it such a special day. We are both hugely grateful.

That’s the thing about growing plants and this lifestyle we’ve adopted in particular. It helps remove the stress of every day existence, makes you smile more and at the same time gives you an enormous feeling of self worth. Sounds a bit ‘trippy’ I know but it’s difficult to explain other than life is much easier now and we’ve learnt to appreciate a simpler less stressful existence.

As well as taking care of the celebrations we’ve also been hard at work in and around the garden. The nursery continues to grow and we have high hopes for our little venture in the future.


The new outbuilding is really starting to come together with the roof now on and pleased to say is now water tight!  Such a relief as one of the roof windows was leaking slightly which actually was down to a tiny hole in the roofing felt can you believe!

Originally we were building the structure for a work shop and potting shed, but we’ve decided to offer weekend courses later in the year and to do that we need to have a few more ‘amenities’. We’ve started cladding the outside and first fix electrics are in. Still much to do but John is taking a few days off work at the end of the month to finish so should be complete by mid  August. We’ll post an update and some pics on the blog and Tania’s Pinterest channel.

We’ll also be posting details of the courses later in the year.


It wasn’t all good news in June I’m afraid.  We lost all our chickens to the fox one night. 😦

Anyone that has kept chickens will understand what it means to have these wonderful characters wandering around place. They give so much pleasure as well as providing us with the most wonderfully fresh eggs for breakfast, but I guess the temptation was too great for Mr Fox and the little bugger tunnelled under the door and took every last one!

I can only think he must have made several visits in the one night unless he had an accomplice? Either way no sign of any chickens the next day other than a few feathers in their run. Cheeky so and so took the eggs as well can you believe.

We always used to shut the chickens away in their shelter at night, but recently we’ve been leaving them out in their pen as the nights have been so warm. We have a large dog so we really didn’t think the fox would have the nerve, but how wrong we were.

Advice for anyone thinking of keeping chickens. Build a fox proof run, or install an electric fence around the premier, or make time to shut them away at night. It was a very sad day and I have to say it’s not been the same around here since they were taken.

On a slightly happier note it’s July and the first of the summer raspberries are fruiting. Two things I look forward to most at this time of the year. Walking through the garden at the end of a busy day and seeing the gorgeous red colour of the first raspberries contrasting with the rich green leaves and plucking the fruit from the bush leaving that little cream cone in the centre. The taste is sublime and there really is nothing quite like it.

The second event we look forward to is the emergence of the first of the sweet peas. You live without that distinctive perfume for almost a whole year and now you get to experience it all over again. Truly intoxicating!

If you’ve never grown your own sweet peas then do have a go as it really is one of life’s pleasures.

No need for expensive air fresheners, simply cut a bunch of fresh sweet peas and fill a vase full of cold fresh water.  Plunge the sweet peas in as deep as possible and enjoy as they don’t last very long once cut.  Put a vase in the kitchen and the next morning when you sit down to breakfast you’ll have the most gorgeous scent filling the room to accompany your coffee and croissants. I don’t think it can get much better than that can it ?

We’ll be back soon but that’s it for June.

If there any aspects of gardening that you’d like us to cover in the future please do let us know, in the first instance at ruralgardeners@gmail.com.

Thanks all!

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How To Build Your Own Out Building

Managed to get a fair bit done in the last week. Feels like we’re making real progress with the new plant shop and potting shed for the nursery.

We took advantage of the long Easter break and cracked on with building the workshop.

I can see us using it for all sorts of things but primarily it will be central to the plant nursery. We really are so blessed to have such a lovely space for the nursery.

I’ve purposely designed the building as an L Shape to offer some protection against the north easterly winds that can whistle across the neighbour’s fields in the winter time, but the position and orientation is also intentional to take advantage of the sun. Essentially it rises from the left of the building and passes right across the front. Perfect for capturing the suns energy.

L Shaped Plan

The left side will be the general workspace come plant store, come prep area and the right side of the building will be open at the front and to the right. As the right side faces south the sunshine streams in pretty much all day.

In fact this whole area to the front of the building is a sun trap and is crying out for a BBQ. There are some left over bricks which we’ll likely recycle for a little BBQ.

As you can see from the pics the build is mainly timber frame construction sitting on a two course plinth of house bricks, which are mainly for aesthetic reasons.

I have quite strong views when it comes to the appearance of buildings and more specifically our responsibility to the surrounding landscape. A view is not just the domain of the originator but something that is shared with the rest of the population and so it’s our responsibility to create something that sits well on the landscape.

Timber frame construction is simpler than it looks and just requires plenty of patience and a large helping of common sense.

Golden rule – Build it straight and true and you will always enjoy the reward of a job well done for years to come.

The wall sections went up ok, made from 4″ x 2″ lengths of treated timber cut to size and held together with 3″ screws. The reason I use screws rather than nails is in the event I’ve make a mistake I can easily take it apart and fix the problem.  When the building is finished I’ll go back and strengthen the joints with nails.

The frame is fixed to the brick plinth with 3″ screws and plugs. I think you can see from the pictures the base plate sits on a damp course membrane all the way around the building. This limits the amount of water permeating from the bricks into the wood. Not absolutely necessary but well worth doing all the same.

potting-shed-8

The eaves are 2.0m high from the concrete base and the ridge is 3.0m from the base which keeps the building within permitted development.

The ridge beam is 6″ x 2″ pressure treated and held in place by 3 sections of 4″ x 2″ timber with the middle piece cut slightly shorter to rest the ridge beam onto, while the side pieces hold it in. Hopefully the pictures explain how it came together but I do plan to offer plans in the near future.

potting-shed-16

I managed to start the roof joists but ran out of wood on Monday so will have to order some more this week.

If you’d like to know how to cut the ridge beams then read my post about building a wood store which you’ll find here.  All I would say is take your time to cut these accurately and in the same way as the wall studs position each upright every 610mm on centre. (It makes fixing 1220 wide boards much easier)

By the end the end of the weekend we’d managed to complete the main structure and start the right leg of the building. I’ll post my next project update when we’ve progressed with the roof structure.

As always any questions about this post or anything else drop us a line to ruralgardeners@gmail.com and we’ll endeavour to answer.

Quick note on the plans.

Thanks to everyone for getting in touch requesting plans … Unfortunately we don’t have any at the moment as it’s all in John’s head!  Just as soon as he gets a few spare evenings we’ll pull a set of plans together and post on the blog.

Hope this was useful.

Roll on the next bank holiday weekend eh!

Thanks all.

John And Tania The Rural Gardeners

 

 

 

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One of the first projects we have to undertake before the build can progress is to build a new workshop. Basically we need a workshop for tools and accessories and additional storage for the various materials we’re going to need over the coming weeks and months for the new build.

Initially we looked at buying an off the shelf shed/garage but for the size we wanted the best price we could find was just under £2,000! and that’s without foundations or any insulation, essentially just your basic shed in fact.

Tommy Walsh built his own workshop out of timber frame so we thought we might go for a similar build. The cost of all the materials came in at just under £1,400 and this included 150mill of insulation, a solid floor a pitched roof and in all likeliness would be made from longer lasting materials.

John is looking to post some plans in the future for anyone thinking of building their own workshop. If you’d like details please drop your email details to ruralgardeners@gmail.com and we’ll let you know just as soon as they are available.

workshop2

Foundations
The first part of the project are the foundations on which we could build the main the timber frame construction. Start by building a frame from 6″ x 1″ shutter boards. Your builders merchant can help you with that one. When working out your sizes add an extra six inches to the actual size to be on the safe side as you don’t want your building sitting exactly on the edge of the base or it may crack the edge of the base over time. I use 2″x2″ post at each corner and half way along to fix the boards to.

Into the frame I break up about 4 inches of hardcore then on top of this I add approx 2″ layer of sharp sand. Helps to stop the hardcore from piercing the damp course. Next a  layer of thick plastic sheeting to stop moisture coming up through the floor, often referred to as a damp course membrane.

Onto this I laid about 3 inches of concrete mixed at a ratio of 3 parts ballast, 1 part sharp sand and 1 part cement. When you have the cement in spade it flat and tamp (basically flattening and removing the air) until it’s nice and level. I find the easiest way is to take a long length of four by two timber long enough to stretch across the width of the base. Then I drag the timber across the foundation frame in a backwards and forward sawing motion. Eventually the concrete will find a level. If you have holes or pockets throw some more concrete mix in and tamp again. Keep checking until you have a smooth surface. Put the work in now and it will pay dividends later when you start the timber frame.

workshop1

I chose to build the foundation walls using concrete blocks, which provide a level base for the timber frame to fixed to.  As soon as the blocks had gone off nice and hard I laid a 4 x 2 timber plate all the way around the perimeter and fixed using heavy duty screws and plugs.

Sole Plate

This pic is from a later project where I used bricks instead of concrete blocks but it shows the sole plate quite nicely.

Timber frame construction

Each section of the workshop was constructed using 4″ x 2″ pressure treated timbers and fixed to the timber plate using 3.5 inch screws. I’ve found the easiest way to construct the frame is to lay each section (wall) out on the lawn and build it first. Cut everything square and to size and you won’t go far wrong.

When you have each of the walls built fix them to the sole plate with a couple of screws while you check everything is nice and level in the corners. Quick tip … make sure you have a long spirit level as your standard DIY spirit level won’t cut it I’m afraid. Employ the help of a friend or family member to hold the corners together while you drill screw and fix. I used 3″ decking screws which worked just fine but depending on the situation you might want to use bolts.

workshop3

Roof
Next came the roof which was also constructed from 4″ x 2″ pressure treated timber, which is actually much easier than you think. Tommy Walsh built a full size template from a sheet of OSB plywood which if this is your first build is probably worth doing. Rather than go into too much detail here take a look at a later build here where I explain in a little more detail how to construct the roof.

potting-shed-16

workshop4

Next job is to clad the roof. I used 18 mill plywood as it covers really well and doesn’t take too long to put it down. You’ll need an extra pair of hands as the sheets are heavy. Alternatively you could cut them down to a smaller size I guess. Onto this I add a layer of roofing underlay finishing off with a good quality grade roofing felt.

You don’t need to use the underlay but it does add that little bit of extra integrity to the roof. Notice we left about a 10″overhang at the end of the ridge beam. This is to ensure the rainwater is kept away from the structure as much as is reasonable.

Interior
The inside is clad with OSB board which is much cheaper than plywood and works fine and as it’s inside the building I wasn’t worrying too much about the finish. I know I wanted wood on the inside as I wanted to hang my tools anywhere without having to worry about finding the studs.

wshop

wshop2

I think you’ll agree it’s starting to come together quite nicely!

In part 2 we’ll look at adding some insulation and finishing off the build.

Best wishes,

John & Tania

Part 2 – How to Build a Workshop

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